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Skin Ulcer

BURNS
Definition

First Degree
Current Treatments
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Second Degree
Current Treatments
Our Treatments

Third Degree
Current Treatments
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Burned Skin

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BURNS
Definition

Burns are classified according to the depth of damage to tissues. First-degree burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin (the epidermis) is burned. The skin is usually reddened, and there may be swelling and pain. In second-degree burns, the top layer of skin has been burned through and the second layer of skin (dermis) is also burned. Blisters develop, accompanied by pain and swelling. Third-degree burns are much more severe. All layers of the skin are damaged, and sometimes fat, nerve, muscle, tendon and even bone are affected

FIRST DEGREE
Current Treatments

First- degree burns typically can be treated with first aid measures at home, but it depends on how large an area and what area of the body is affected. Most of the time, people do not know what stage of burn they have. A majority of people today will need to visit the hospital for instructions on how to treat their burn. The hospital, or doctor's office, will instruct the patient to then to cleanse and protect the burn to minimize infection. Or, the patient may have the physician do the wound care at the site. The burn must be thoroughly cleaned with a disinfectant. This process can be painful, depending on the size and location of the burn. Then the burn will be treated with an antibiotic, and then wrapped with a clean, dry cotton bandage. This process needs to be repeated usually for a period of one to two weeks, depending on the size and location of the burn. First-degree burns do not typically leave a scar.

Our Treatment

This treatment is very simple and effective. It doesn't differ for first- or second-degree burns. So unless the burn is severe, (third degree), you will not have to go to the doctor. First you will need to clean the burn thoroughly, removing any dirt or other articles. Do not clean the affected area with a disinfectant. This is not required. Then lance any blisters on the surface, this can be done with a small needle or knife. Then to prepare the bandage: take a cotton swath, preferably big enough to be folded approximately four times, fold and cut to the appropriate size of the burn, and then coat the bandage with enough medication so as not to soak it, but completely cover the bandage surfaces. Then apply the bandage dressing to the affected skin area, covering the bandage with dry cotton dressing and securely swathing the bandaged skin area. Leave the bandage in place for 48 hours. For first degree burns, this process needs to be repeated three times. The total treatment will last for 6 days, and leave no scar. It does not require doctor supervision. Also, for about one week after the burn is healed completely, the patient should avoid direct sunlight on the burn for about a week

SECOND DEGREE
Current Treatments

Second-degree burns normally require care from a physician. Often they are serious enough where most people are afraid to treat the burn at home for fear of a scar or infection. As with first-degree burns, people will have a hard time classifying their burn by themselves. The hospital, or doctor's office, will cleanse and disinfect the burn and the affected area. If it is a chemical burn, then the procedure changes slightly. For chemical burns, odds are that the burned area will have to be removed by the doctor. This then involves skin grafts, or ugly scarring. Some regular second-degree burns also require skin grafts. Most physicians will chose to perform a skin graft when a second-degree burn is located in a place where cosmetics are important. Such as the face, arms, and legs. If a skin graft is called for, then the patient must have surgery. For now, the only permanent replacement for human skin is human skin. In what's known as an autograft, surgeons remove healthy skin from another part of the burned person's body and graft it to the burned treat to cover the wound. Grafted skin is usually very thin and doesn't contain sweat and oil glands or hair follicles. It covers - but it doesn't function as effectively as healthy skin. If the second-degree burn is not severe enough to require a graft, then the doctor will wrap the burn with cotton dressing. The patient will then have to either then clean and change the dressing at home or continue going to the doctor for this. This process will have to be repeated 11/2 to 2 months on the average. Depending on the size and depth of the burn, scarring will probably result.

Our Treatment

This treatment is very simple and effective. It doesn't change for chemical burns either. This medicine will heal the skin normally requiring removal by modern medicine. You do not have to go to the doctor. First you will need to clean the burn thoroughly, removing any dirt or other articles. Do not clean the affected area with a disinfectant. This is not required. Then lance any blisters on the surface, this can be done with a small needle or knife. Then to prepare the bandage: take a cotton swath, preferably big enough to be folded approximately four times, fold and cut to the appropriate size of the burn. Coat the bandage with enough medication so as not to soak it, but completely cover the bandage surfaces. Then apply the bandage dressing to the affected skin area, covering the bandage with a thin layer of dry cotton dressing and securely swathing the bandaged skin area. Leave the bandage in place for 48 hours. For second-degree burns, this process needs to be repeated five to six times. The total treatment will last for about two weeks, depending on the size and severity of the burn. Also, for about one week after the burn is healed completely, the patient should not wash the burned area with soap. The patient should also avoid direct sunlight on the burn for about a week. Second-degree burns will normally not leave a scar with this medicine

THIRD DEGREE
Current Treatments

Third-degree burns always require a physicians care in today's medical world. They are severe enough where generally there is muscle or bone showing in the burn.Third-degree burns will require lengthy hospital stays, as well as surgery for skin grafts. The risk of infection in a third degree burn is very high. Over sixty percent of people that die from third-degree burns do not die from the burn, rather the infection that the burn caused. With this level of burn, depending on the size, the patient may have to be isolated for prolonged periods of time, so as to not risk infection from outside sources. The hospital will cleanse and disinfect the burn and the affected area. With third-degree burns, because of the severity of the burn, generally it does not make a big difference if it is chemical related. The procedure on third-degree burns, the skin left of the burn has to be removed. In some cases, if the tissue or bone underneath the burn has been damaged, then it will also be removed. Then there will be surgery to perform multiple or single skin grafts; again, depending on the size and depth of the burn. For now, the only permanent replacement for human skin is human skin. In what's known as an autograft, surgeons remove healthy skin from another part of the burned person's body and graft it to the burned treat to cover the wound. Grafted skin is usually very thin and doesn't contain sweat and oil glands or hair follicles. It covers - but it doesn't function as effectively as healthy skin. After the surgery the patient then faces months of rehabilitation both physically and mentally. Dealing with the scar left from burns and skin grafts can be emotionally hard for people if it is in a cosmetic area. Such as the face, arms, or legs. The process for dealing with this severe of an injury will normally take 5 to 6 months. It requires long hard hours of therapy, and a lot of money in medical bills. With third-degree burns, there is always scarring.

Our Treatment

This treatment is very simple and effective. It doesn't change for chemical burns either. This medicine will heal the skin that normally requires removal by modern medicine. You do not have to go to the doctor. First you will need to remove any dirt or other articles with sanitary cotton. Do not clean the affected area with a disinfectant. This is not required. Then lance any blisters on the surface, this can be done with a small needle or knife. With third-degree burns, there is the possibility that there will be bone or muscle tissue exposed. Prepare proper size of gauze or bandage preferably folded about four times for a suitable thickness and dress by depositing an enough amount of the medicine on it so as not to soak into the folded bandage. Apply the bandage dressing to the affected skin area, cover the bandage dressing with a thick layer of cotton, and securely swath the bandaged skin area. Leave this in place for 48 hours. Repeat this treatment until the skin is healed. When changing the cotton dressings on third-degree burns, do not be alarmed to see yellow smelly pus on the affected area. This is common with third-degree burns. Simply dab the affected area with a cotton ball, carefully drying out the burn. Patients should not wash the healed area with soap for one week after completing the treatment. They should also be careful about exposing the healed burn to direct sunlight for about two weeks. This treatment will take approximately one month or longer to heal, depending on severity of the original burn. Healing time depends solely on the size and depth of the burn. For minimum scar, the patient is always required to be treated with this medicine right after the burn.


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